Dog Teeth

Why They’re Important and How to Keep Them Healthy

Dogs’ teeth are an integral part of their body, so it’s important to keep them healthy and strong. Many dog owners know to brush their dogs’ teeth regularly and provide chew toys, but there’s much more you can do to keep your dog’s teeth clean, healthy, and strong. Check out this list of helpful hints on caring for your dog’s teeth and find out how you can give your best friend the happiest, healthiest smile possible!

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 The Importance of Dogs’ Teeth

There are a lot of important aspects to being a dog owner. One of the most important is taking care of your dog’s teeth. Here are some helpful tips for keeping your pup’s chompers healthy and strong.

  •  Brush your puppy’s teeth daily with doggie toothpaste, or brush with water mixed with natural toothpaste like baking soda or coconut oil.dog, pet, canine-3782188.jpg
  •  Provide raw bones from time-to-time so they have something fun to chew on that will help keep their teeth clean as well.
  •  Do not feed them table scraps or human food – it can rot their teeth and cause them to be too soft.
  •  For an added bonus, add dental chews like Greenies or Dentley’s Chews in small doses to provide extra oral health benefits.
  •  Always use safe toys that won’t damage their teeth while playing – things like balls and ropes work best!
  •  Give them plenty of fresh water at all times as well so they don’t develop dry mouth, which can lead to bad breath.

 The Importance of Dogs’ Teeth

There are a lot of important aspects to being a dog owner. One of the most important is taking care of your dog’s teeth. Here are some helpful tips for keeping your pup’s chompers healthy and strong.

  •  Brush your puppy’s teeth daily with doggie toothpaste, or brush with water mixed with natural toothpaste like baking soda or coconut oil.dog, pet, canine-3782188.jpg
  •  Provide raw bones from time-to-time so they have something fun to chew on that will help keep their teeth clean as well.
  •  Do not feed them table scraps or human food – it can rot their teeth and cause them to be too soft.
  •  For an added bonus, add dental chews like Greenies or Dentley’s Chews in small doses to provide extra oral health benefits.
  •  Always use safe toys that won’t damage their teeth while playing – things like balls and ropes work best!
  •  Give them plenty of fresh water at all times as well so they don’t develop dry mouth, which can lead to bad breath.

     Biting Pressure

Biting pressure is an important measurement for dogs of all shapes and sizes, because it can provide insights into the health of your puppy’s mouth. Normal biting pressure in a dog ranges from 40-120 pounds per square inch.dog, pet, hovawart-1194087.jpg

The lower the number, the worse the condition of your puppy’s teeth–both gum and tooth health are usually reflected by this number. Biting pressure isn’t just about a healthy mouth though; it can also be used as an indicator for other problems such as heart or lung disease.

Understanding what normal biting pressure looks like will help you spot abnormalities quickly so you can address any issues before they become more serious or turn into something even more serious, like cancer.

Different Uses of Dog Teeth

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Use your dog’s teeth for many different things. You can use them to dig, tear, chew and hold things.

Digging

When hunting, the dog digs for its prey. It uses its canine teeth to bite into the ground, then uses its incisors to dig deeper. The canine teeth are larger than the incisors, so they can get into more clay or dirt than the incisors can.

Tearing

If you have a dog that likes to chew on rawhide bones or hard rubber toys, then this is an excellent way to use their teeth. They will chew through the rubber and leave it in shreds. If you want to make sure that your dog chews on only good treats, then you should put them in separate containers from their chewing toys. This way if they get distracted by another toy or bone, then their chewing won’t ruin their treat!

Chewing

Dogs also use their teeth for chewing up food like bones and rawhide chews (which we all know can be dangerous if swallowed). They also use their teeth to eat meat because they have no teeth in front like humans do! Dogs have flat molars that are perfect for chewing.

What is the Difference in Puppy Teeth and Dog Teeth

Dog teeth are very different from puppy teeth. Dog teeth are short and flat at the back, while puppy teeth are long and curved. The adult dog’s teeth have been replaced by a full set of permanent adult teeth which look very similar to the puppy teeth.

Puppy Teeth

Puppy teeth are small and flat at the back, with a point in front. The puppy tooth is not attached directly to the gum line of the mouth, but instead lies just above it as an extension of the gum tissue. The roots of these teeth extend deep into the jaw bone. Puppy teeth do not erupt until about six weeks of age and continue to erupt for about 18 months before falling out naturally around two years old.

Dog Teeth

Adult dog teeth have been replaced by permanent adult dog teeth which look very similar to puppy teeth, but are longer and flatter at the back (like human molars). Adult dog teeth usually start erupting around three months old and continue erupting until about one year old when they fall out naturally without any treatment required.

Conclusion

A healthy dog is a happy dog! Keeping your puppy’s teeth clean and white can help prevent bad breath, gum disease, tooth decay, heart disease, dental problems, seizures, kidney disease, and death. Brush at least once a day or up to 3 times per week with toothpaste that’s safe for dogs. Make sure the bristles are soft enough so they don’t scrape the sensitive gums. If you’re brushing your puppy’s teeth every day you may need to use desensitizing toothpaste to protect against sensitivity. It takes time for plaque (a sticky film of bacteria) to build up on teeth which means it takes time for tartar (hardened plaque) to form.